Social Development

Social Development

The concept of social development lies in the concept of socialization. This means a commitment that development processes need to benefit people, particularly but not only the poor, but also a recognition that people, and the way they interact in groups and society, and the norms that facilitate such interaction, shape development processes. To understand that, we have to understand socialization at the time of his birth, a child is very selfish. He does not know about sharing his joys and toys with others. Social development most often refers to how a child develops friendships and other relationships, as well how a child handles conflict with peers.

Social Development refers to the process by which a child learns to interact with others around them. Round die age of two, he realizes that he is just a little man in the complex order. Others also matter and that he alone does not matter. Giving and taking starts. As they develop and perceive their own individuality within their community, they also gain skills to communicate with other people and process their actions.

Social development thus implies the change in social institutions. Progress toward an inclusive society, for example, implies that individuals treat each other (more) fairly in their daily lives, whether in the family, workplace or in public office. This we call socialization and social development. Social development never takes place in isolation. A child left in the jungle will not be social. It is as a result of an interaction that social development takes place. That is why schools exist. A man going through schooling is a better socially developed man as compared to one who never went to it.

 

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