Employees Training Process - Assignment Point
Employees Training Process
Subject: Business, Human Resource Management | Topics:

Employees frequently develop a greater sense of self-worth, dignity and well-being as they become more valuable to the firm and to society. Generally they will receive a greater share of the material gains that result from their increased productivity. These factors give them a sense of satisfaction through the achievement of personal and company goals.

The model below traces the steps necessary in the training process:

  • Organizational Objectives
  • Needs Assessment
  • Is There a Gap?
  • Training Objectives
  • Select the Trainees
  • Select the Training Methods and Mode
  • Choose a Means of Evaluating
  • Administer Training
  • Evaluate the Training

Your business should have a clearly defined strategy and set of objectives that direct and drive all the decisions made especially for training decisions. Firms that plan their training process are more successful than those that do not. Most business owners want to succeed, but do not engage in training designs that promise to improve their chances of success. Why? The five reasons most often identified are:

Time – Small businesses managers find that time demands do not allow them to train employees.

Getting started – Most small business managers have not practiced training employees. The training process is unfamiliar.

Broad expertise – Managers tend to have broad expertise rather than the specialized skills needed for training and development activities.

Lack of trust and openness – Many managers prefer to keep information to themselves. By doing so they keep information from subordinates and others who could be useful in the training and development process.

Skepticism as to the value of the training – Some small business owners believe the future cannot be predicted or controlled and their efforts, therefore, are best centered on current activities i.e., making money today.

A well-conceived training program can help your firm succeed. A program structured with the company’s strategy and objectives in mind has a high probability of improving productivity and other goals that are set in the training mission.

For any business, formulating a training strategy requires addressing a series of questions.

  • Who are your customers? Why do they buy from you?
  • Who are your competitors? How do they serve the market? What competitive advantages do they enjoy? What parts of the market have they ignored?
  • What strengths does the company have? What weaknesses?
  • What social trends are emerging that will affect the firm?

The purpose of formulating a training strategy is to answer two relatively simple but vitally important questions: (1) What is our business? and (2) What should our business be? Armed with the answers to these questions and a clear vision of its mission, strategy and objectives, a company can identify its training needs.

 

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