Performance Enrichment of Human Resource Management - Assignment Point
Performance Enrichment of Human Resource Management
Subject: Human Resource Management | Topics:

Performance is a key issue for Interact. Managers need to consider aspects of effective performance given the recent decline in this area. The three aspect of managing individual performance are as follows,

Planning Performance:

While many planning models focus on the articulation of intended outcomes, few devote enough Attention to formulating plans for measuring whether or not those outcomes were achieved. By failing to plan for evaluation, program staff misses key opportunities for collecting evaluation data and scramble at the last minute to collect any type of evidence which attests to the program’s success. Perhaps the most important part of Planning for Performance is planning for performance measurement. Consequently, the central purpose of this publication is to help county-based Extension professionals incorporate a performance measurement focus into their long-range program plans. By planning to measure the performance of their programs, they are better prepared to meet current and future accountability challenges.

Functions of Planning

The process of program planning serves several useful functions in today’s Extension organization. A few of these functions are identified below.

  • Direction – Program planning helps to identify what is important to the people of a particular county. It helps the Cooperative Extension Service set program priorities.
  • Intent – A plan of work helps communicate to the public what the organization intends to focus on over a specified period of time.
  • Commitment – The best way to ensure follow through on intentions is to put those intentions in writing. A plan of work makes a commitment to act in accordance with intentions.
  • Evaluation – The planning process encourages us to define what success will look like and how it will be measured.
  • Accountability – A comprehensive plan of work lets decision-makers know how the organization plans to allocate valuable resources and the results it intends to be accountable for producing.

Supporting Performance:

I will consider the current and future needs in terms of support they require to improve their performance in key areas, where foundation trusts must strive for excellence:

  • self-governing to the highest standards
  • effective strategic planning and risk management
  • contributing to the sustainability of the wider healthcare system
  • continuous improvement at all levels – quality, efficiency, productivity and business opportunities

Reviewing Performance:

The aims of the review procedure are to provide continuous monitoring, and to have a good level of detailed data always available so that there is minimal delay in problem analysis.

Generally, there should be a progressive review of data. You should review daily data weekly, and weekly data monthly, unless any incident report or review raises questions that require an immediate check of the next level of detail. This should be enough to detect out-of-line situations with a minimum of effort.

The review procedure also ensures that additional data is available for problem determination, should it be needed. The weekly review should require approximately one hour, particularly after experience has been gained in the process and after you are able to highlight the items that require special consideration. The monthly review will probably take half a day at first. After the procedure has been in force for a period, it will probably be completed more quickly. However, when new applications are installed or when the transaction volumes or numbers of terminals are increased, the process is likely to take longer.

When reviewing performance data, try to:

  • Establish the basic pattern in the workload of the installation
  • Identify variations from the pattern

Critical incident method:

  • Critical incident is a method used for many sectors.
  • Critical incident method- Recording of events by appraiser. An incident is critical when it illustrates what the employers has done or failed to do
  • The critical incidents for performance appraisal is a method in which the manager writes down positive and negative performance behavior of employees throughout the performance period.
  • Each employee will be evaluated as such and one’s performance appraisal will be based on the logs that are put in the evaluation form.

Weighted checklist

1. Definition of weighted checklist

This method describe a performance appraisal method where rater familiar with the jobs being evaluated prepared a large list of descriptive statements about effective and ineffective behavior on jobs.

2. Process of weighted checklist

  • HR department and Managers / Supervisors will set up checklist for each position
  • If the rater believes strongly that the employee possesses a particular listed trait, he checks the item; otherwise, he leaves the item blank.
  • Does he give respect to his superiors? Yes/No
  • Does he follow instructions properly? Yes/No
  • Does he make mistakes frequently? Yes/No
  • The value of each question may be weighted equally or certain questions may be weighted more heavily than others.

3. Sample of weighted checklist

In this task I have been asked to  provide effective training is seen as a critical activity by Interacts employees. Identifying learning and training needs would be at the heart of this activity

Conventional training is required to cover essential work-related skills, techniques and knowledge, and much of this section deals with taking a positive progressive approach to this sort of traditional ‘training’.

Here is a relatively simple overview of typical reference models, processes and tools found in the effective planning and delivery of organizational training.

  • Design development need: Conduct some sort of training needs analysis. Another method example of assessing and prioritizing training is DIF Analysis.
    This commonly happens in the appraisal process Involve the people in identifying and agreeing relevant aligned training. Consider organizational values and aspects of integrity and ethics, and spirituality, love and compassion at work as well as skills.
  • Design development activity: Having identified what you want to train and develop in people, we  must break down the training or learning requirement into manageable elements.  Attach standards or measures or parameters to each element.  The 360 degree process and template and the simple training planner are useful tools. Revisit the skill-sets and training needs analysis tools – they can help organize and training elements assessment on a large scale.
  • Carry out development: People’s learning styles greatly affect what type of training they will find easiest and most effective. Look also at personality types. Remember you are dealing with people, not objects. People have feelings as well as skills and knowledge.  The Eriksson model is wonderful for understanding more about this. So is the Johari Window model.  Consider the team and the group. Adair’s theory helps. So does the Tuckman model.
  • Evaluate Development: Consider evaluation training effectiveness, which includes before-and-after measurements. The Kirkpatrick model especially helps you to structure training design.  Consider Bloom’s theory too, so that you can understand what sort of development you are actually addressing. Consider team activities and exercises. Presentation is an important aspect to delivery.

Before I get started, lets define leadership. Leadership is a process by which a person influences others to accomplish an objective and directs the organization in a way that makes it more cohesive and coherent. Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal.

Leadership Model:

Four Framework Approach

In the Four Framework Approach, Bolman and Deal (1991) suggest that leaders display leadership behaviors in one of four types of frameworks: Structural, Human Resource, Political, or Symbolic.

This model suggests that leaders can be put into one of these four categories and there are times when one approach is appropriate and times when it would not be. We also need to understand ourselves as each of us tends to have a preferred approach. We need to be conscious of this at all times and be aware of the limitations of just favoring one approach.

Structural Framework: In an effective leadership situation, the leader is a social architect whose leadership style is analysis and design. While in an ineffective leadership situation, the leader is a petty tyrant whose leadership style is details. Structural Leaders focus on structure, strategy, environment, implementation, experimentation, and adaptation.

Human Resource Framework: In an effective leadership situation, the leader is a catalyst and servant whose leadership style is support, advocating, and empowerment. while in an ineffective leadership situation, the leader is a pushover, whose leadership style is abdication and fraud.

Political Framework: In an effective leadership situation, the leader is an advocate, whose leadership style is coalition and building. While in an ineffective leadership situation, the leader is a hustler, whose leadership style is manipulation. Political leaders clarify what they want and what they can get; they assess the distribution of power and interests; they build linkages to other stakeholders, use persuasion first, then use negotiation and coercion only if necessary.

Symbolic Framework: In an effective leadership situation, the leader is a prophet, whose leadership style is inspiration. While in an ineffective leadership situation, the leader is a fanatic or fool, whose leadership style is smoke and mirrors. Symbolic leaders view organizations as a stage or theater to play certain roles and give impressions; these leaders use symbols to capture attention; they try to frame experience by providing plausible interpretations of experiences; they discover and communicate a vision.

The coercive style is the least flexible and its use should be limited to emergency situations, like a pending takeover or recovery from natural disasters.  Its failure to foster pride or to support the development of initiative on the part of its employees places the largest constraint on its utility.  On the opposite end of the spectrum, the authoritative style is the most effective in every aspect of an organization’s climate.  An authoritative leader provides a clear vision that motivates the employees to be creative in their pursuit of the organization’s mission while providing a supportive structure.  However, an authoritative leader must resist the temptation to be overbearing, especially in the presence of experts and peers.  The affinitive style is based upon a caring and nurturing approach, which works well in conjunction with the authoritative style.  Affinitive leaders attempt to develop trust and create harmony through the use of continuous positive feedback.  These features allow for the development of bonds, teamwork, and communication that are needed when new teams are forming or tension exists within a current group.  The successful implementation of this style greatly depends upon the development level of the employee. 

Leadership and motivation:

Motivation is a goal-oriented characteristic that helps a person achieve his objectives. It pushes an individual to work hard at achieving his or her goals. An executive must have the right leadership traits to influence motivation. However, there is no specific blueprint for motivation. As a leader, one should keep an open perspective on human nature. Knowing different needs of subordinates will certainly make the decision-making process easier.

Purpose of Employee Training and Development Process

Reasons for emphasizing the growth and development of personnel include

  • Creating a pool of readily available and adequate replacements for personnel who may leave or move up in the organization.
  • Enhancing the company’s ability to adopt and use advances in technology because of a sufficiently knowledgeable staff.
  • Building a more efficient, effective and highly motivated team, which enhances the company’s competitive position and improves employee morale.
  • Ensuring adequate human resources for expansion into new programs.

Research has shown specific benefits that a small business receives from training and developing its workers, including:

  • Increased productivity.
  • Reduced employee turnover.
  • Increased efficiency resulting in financial gains.
  • Decreased need for supervision.

Employees frequently develop a greater sense of self-worth, dignity and well-being as they become more valuable to the firm and to society.

The Training Process

The model below traces the steps necessary in the training process:

  • Organizational Objectives
  • Needs Assessment
  • Is There a Gap?
  • Training Objectives
  • Select the Trainees
  • Select the Training Methods and Mode
  • Choose a Means of Evaluating
  • Administer Training
  • Evaluate the Training

Most business owners want to succeed, but do not engage in training designs that promise to improve their chances of success. Why? The five reasons most often identified are:

Time – Small businesses managers find that time demands do not allow them to train employees.

Getting started – Most small business managers have not practiced training employees. The training process is unfamiliar.

Broad expertise – Managers tend to have broad expertise rather than the specialized skills needed for training and development activities.

Lack of trust and openness – Many managers prefer to keep information to themselves. By doing so they keep information from subordinates and others who could be useful in the training and development process.

Skepticism as to the value of the training – Some small business owners believe the future cannot be predicted or controlled and their efforts, therefore, are best centered on current activities i.e., making money today.

A well-conceived training program can help your firm succeed. A program structured with the company’s strategy and objectives in mind has a high probability of improving productivity and other goals that are set in the training mission.

For any business, formulating a training strategy requires addressing a series of questions.

  • Who are your customers? Why do they buy from you?
  • Who are your competitors? How do they serve the market? What competitive advantages do they enjoy? What parts of the market have they ignored?
  • What strengths does the company have? What weaknesses?
  • What social trends are emerging that will affect the firm?

The purpose of formulating a training strategy is to answer two relatively simple but vitally important questions: (1) What is our business? and (2) What should our business be? Armed with the answers to these questions and a clear vision of its mission, strategy and objectives, a company can identify its training needs.

Identifying Training Needs

Training needs can be assessed by analyzing three major human resource areas: the organization as a whole, the job characteristics and the needs of the individuals. This analysis will provide answers to the following questions:

  • Where is training needed?
  • What specifically must an employee learn in order to be more productive?
  • Who needs to be trained?

This analysis will provide some benchmarks against which the effectiveness of a training program can be evaluated. Your firm should know where it wants to be in five years from its long-range strategic plan. What you need is a training program to take your firm from here to there.

Second, consider whether the organization is financially committed to supporting the training efforts. If not, any attempt to develop a solid training program will fail.

Next, determine exactly where training is needed. It is foolish to implement a companywide training effort without concentrating resources where they are needed most. An internal audit will help point out areas that may benefit from training. Also, a skills inventory can help determine the skills possessed by the employees in general. This inventory will help the organization determine what skills are available now and what skills are needed for future development.

Also, in today’s market-driven economy, you would be remiss not to ask your customers what they like about your business and what areas they think should be improved. In summary, the analysis should focus on the total organization and should tell you (1) where training is needed and (2) where it will work within the organization.

Once you have determined where training is needed, concentrate on the content of the program. Analyze the characteristics of the job based on its description, the written narrative of what the employee actually does. Training based on job descriptions should go into detail about how the job is performed on a task-by-task basis. Actually doing the job will enable you to get a better feel for what is done.

Selection of Trainees

Once you have decided what training is necessary and where it is needed, the next decision is who should be trained? For a small business, this question is crucial. Training an employee is expensive, especially when he or she leaves your firm for a better job. Therefore, it is important to carefully select who will be trained.

Training programs should be designed to consider the ability of the employee to learn the material and to use it effectively, and to make the most efficient use of resources possible. It is also important that employees be motivated by the training experience.

Training Goals

The goals of the training program should relate directly to the needs determined by the assessment process outlined above. Course objectives should clearly state what behavior or skill will be changed as a result of the training and should relate to the mission and strategic plan of the company. Goals should include milestones to help take the employee from where he or she is today to where the firm wants him or her in the future

Training Methods

There are two broad types of training available to small businesses: on-the-job and off-the-job techniques. Individual circumstances and the “who,” “what” and “why” of your training program

determine which method to use.

On-the-job training is delivered to employees while they perform their regular jobs. In this way, they do not lose time while they are learning. After a plan is developed for what should be taught, employees should be informed of the details. A timetable should be established with periodic evaluations to inform employees about their progress. On-the-job techniques include orientations, job instruction training, apprenticeships, internships and assistantships, job rotation and coaching.

Off-the-job techniques include lectures, special study, films, television conferences or discussions, case studies, role playing, simulation, programmed instruction and laboratory training. Most of these techniques can be used by small businesses although, some may be too costly.

Orientations are for new employees. The first several days on the job are crucial in the success of new employees. This point is illustrated by the fact that 60 percent of all employees who quit do so in the first ten days. Orientation training should emphasize the following topics:

  • The company’s history and mission.
  • The key members in the organization.
  • The key members in the department, and how the department helps fulfill the mission of the company.
  • Personnel rules and regulations.

Some companies use verbal presentations while others have written presentations. Many small businesses convey these topics in one-on-one orientations. No matter what method is used, it is important that the newcomer understand his or her new place of employment.

Lectures present training material verbally and are used when the goal is to present a great deal of material to many people. It is more cost effective to lecture to a group than to train people individually. Lecturing is one-way communication and as such may not be the most effective way to train. Also, it is hard to ensure that the entire audience understands a topic on the same level; by targeting the average attendee you may undertrain some and lose others. Despite these drawbacks, lecturing is the most cost-effective way of reaching large audiences.

Role playing and simulation are training techniques that attempt to bring realistic decision making situations to the trainee. Likely problems and alternative solutions are presented for discussion. The adage there is no better trainer than experience is exemplified with this type of training. Experienced employees can describe real world experiences, and can help in and learn from developing the solutions to these simulations. This method is cost effective and is used in marketing and management training.

Audiovisual methods such as television, videotapes and films are the most effective means of providing real world conditions and situations in a short time. One advantage is that the presentation is the same no matter how many times it’s played. This is not true with lectures, which can change as the speaker is changed or can be influenced by outside constraints.

Job rotation involves moving an employee through a series of jobs so he or she can get a good feel for the tasks that are associated with different jobs. It is usually used in training for supervisory positions. The employee learns a little about everything. This is a good strategy for small businesses because of the many jobs an employee may be asked to do.

Apprenticeships develop employees who can do many different tasks. They usually involve several related groups of skills that allow the apprentice to practice a particular trade, and they take place over a long period of time in which the apprentice works for, and with, the senior skilled worker. Apprenticeships are especially appropriate for jobs requiring production skills.

Internships and assistantships are usually a combination of classroom and on-the-job training. They are often used to train prospective managers or marketing personnel.

Programmed learning, computer-aided instruction and interactive video all have one thing in common: they allow the trainee to learn at his or her own pace. Also, they allow material already learned to be bypassed in favor of material with which a trainee is having difficulty. After the introductory period, the instructor need not be present, and the trainee can learn as his or her time allows. These methods sound good, but may be beyond the resources of some small businesses.

Laboratory training is conducted for groups by skilled trainers. It usually is conducted at a neutral site and is used by upper- and middle management trainees to develop a spirit of teamwork and an increased ability to deal with management and peers. It can be costly and usually is offered by larger small businesses.

Trainers

Who actually conducts the training depends on the type of training needed and who will be receiving it. On-the-job training is conducted mostly by supervisors; off-the-job training, by either in-house personnel or outside instructors.

In-house training is the daily responsibility of supervisors and employees. Supervisors are ultimately responsible for the productivity and, therefore, the training of their subordinates. These supervisors should be taught the techniques of good training. They must be aware of the knowledge and skills necessary to make a productive employee. Trainers should be taught to establish goals and objectives for their training and to determine how these objectives can be used to influence the productivity of their departments.

There are several ways to select training personnel for off-the-job training programs. Many small businesses use in-house personnel to develop formal training programs to be delivered to employees off line from their normal work activities, during company meetings or individually at prearranged training sessions.

There are many outside training sources, including consultants, technical and vocational schools, continuing education programs, chambers of commerce and economic development groups. Selecting an outside source for training has advantages and disadvantages. The biggest advantage is that these organizations are well versed in training techniques, which is often not the case with in-house personnel.

Whoever is selected to conduct the training, either outside or in-house trainers, it is important that the company’s goals and values be carefully explained.

Training Administration

Having planned the training program properly, you must now administer the training to the selected employees. It is important to follow through to make sure the goals are being met. Questions to consider before training begins include:

  • Location.
  • Facilities.
  • Accessibility.
  • Comfort.
  • Equipment.
  • Timing.

Careful attention to these operational details will contribute to the success of the training program.

An effective training program administrator should follow these steps:

  • Define the organizational objectives.
  • Determine the needs of the training program.
  • Define training goals.
  • Develop training methods.
  • Decide whom to train.
  • Decide who should do the training.
  • Administer the training.
  • Evaluate the training program.

Following these steps will help an administrator develop an effective training program to ensure that the firm keeps qualified employees who are productive, happy workers. This will contribute positively to the bottom line.

Evaluation of Training

Training should be evaluated several times during the process. Determine these milestones when you develop the training. Employees should be evaluated by comparing their newly acquired skills with the skills defined by the goals of the training program. Any discrepancies should be noted and adjustments made to the training program to enable it to meet specified goals. Many training programs fall short of their expectations simply because the administrator failed to evaluate its progress until it was too late. Timely evaluation will prevent the training from straying from its goals.

Many employees have complained about their concerns regarding the perception that they need to work harder and longer in order to retain their jobs, increased levels of stress, resulting in higher levels of absenteeism and turnover. my suggestion is management regarding this issue. There is

  • Offer flexible working:  Flexible working is now extremely attractive to a lot of workers, who value the ability to have more control over their work-life balance and their time. Surveys regularly show that initiatives such as flexi-working are increasingly becoming as important as, and in some cases more important than, pay. Flexible working includes flexible hours, remote working, part-time options and sabbatical leave.
  • Communicate : Transparency and good communication are essential to a happy workforce. When staff don’t feel they are being dealt with openly and honestly, tensions can grow and employees can feel suspicious, worried and resentful. Regularly update staff on company news, such as financial performance, future plans and other new developments.
  • Reward staff: Make sure that good work is recognised. This does not have to involve financial bonuses but could include things such as small rewards, public recognition and increased responsibility.
  • Be clear :  One often overlooked source of stress for employees can be when they are unclear on what is expected of them. Be fair and make sure staff are clear about expectations and targets. Make sure staff are made to realise that the role they perform is important and that they understand why.
  • Give opportunities to progress : If staff feel like they are working hard for your business, yet being left to stagnate, they will take their talent and skills elsewhere. Opportunities for progression can include subsidised training and workshops, and mentoring schemes.
  • More than money:  Nowadays, employee benefits are as important as, if not more important than, pay for many workers. The most popular employee perks are those such as company pensions and private medical insurance schemes. Initiatives such as private health insurance, gym membership and workplace fruit schemes also show staff that their employer cares about their health.
  • Give feedback: Feedback is important to staff and is a key way to boost morale and boost productivity. Regular informal feedback is important, as well as more structured initiatives such as appraisals.
  • Free coffee and tea:  Even small perks such as free tea, coffee and biscuits make staff feel valued and foster an atmosphere of team-working. Think about low-cost initiatives which bring people together such as occasional social events and the odd office lunch and even family events.
  • Create a pleasant environment: Make sure the workplace is a pleasant place to be, with enough space and a good temperature. Perhaps you could allow staff to have a say in workplace issues such as how their space is decorated and what is on the walls.
  • Be open: Make staff feel like they have a voice at your organisation by creating an open atmosphere where new ideas and feedback are welcomed at all levels of the company.

In this task I have been asked to provide suggestion to reduce absenteeism. the following could form recommendations for absenteeism.

1. Redefine Overtime

It was established that a common practice for electricians is to miss a day of regular pay to work hours that pay time-and-a-half.  Although they have taken a day off, they still work a 40-hour week but get overtime pay for any hours beyond regular work hours.  Such workers, in effect, have given themselves a raise. Some companies have redefined overtime in their labor agreements as a way of addressing this problem.

It was also found that companies should not offer overtime as an incentive to keep workers from moving to other jobs. This approach can backfire and will adversely affect budgets.

2. Use Incentive Programs

Mixed responses about incentive programs were noticed.  Most of the people claimed these programs would help reduce their absenteeism and turnover.  However, management believed that incentive programs don’t work. Although the effectiveness of incentive programs was not studied, many ideas from respondents within the research were received.  Following are some of the responses we received:

  • On larger projects, all employees who work 40 hours per week for all periods throughout the month are eligible for a drawing to win a prize at the end of the month.
  • Every week, if 40 hours are worked the previous week, a ticket is earned. Every week during a large project, small prizes are up for lottery by drawing a ticket.  At the end of the project, the accumulated tickets are put into a hat, and one name is drawn for a new vehicle or other large prize.
  • On large projects, workers would get a raffle ticket every day they show up on time and show a clear safety record.  At the end of every month, have a raffle. Then at the end of the job, raffle a high-priced item.  This would promote safety and reduce tardiness and absenteeism.

3. Change Work Schedules

Electricians reported that one way to reduce absenteeism was to schedule 40 hours in four days instead of five.  A schedule of 10 hours per day, Monday through Thursday, would leave electricians time on Fridays to conduct business or rest.  A missed day under this schedule would also result in a higher financial loss for workers.  Another suggestion was to schedule four 9-hour days with a half-day on Friday.

4. Establish Safe Work Sites

Research showed that injuries play a key role in absenteeism.  Electricians also reported wanting to work on safe construction sites. Potentially dangerous tools, equipment, and materials exist on all construction sites.  Therefore, an ongoing, proactive safety program can significantly reduce both absenteeism and turnover.  Having a good safety record can result in a company becoming a company of choice.  A company of choice is one that proactively inspires worker productivity and loyalty and thus, has fewer problems with absenteeism and turnover.

5. Become a Company of Choice

Many of the companies that were surveyed said they did not have much of a problem with turnover simply because they were a company of choice.  Companies of choice enjoy a stable workforce because their programs and policies build worker loyalty.  Following are some of their methods:

  • Provide safe work sites
  • Treat workers with respect
  • Provide lunch
  • Host company get-togethers
  • Promote an “open-door” policy between workers and management
  • Provide training or assistance with training
  • Provide daycare or assistance with daycare
  • Provide flexible schedules

The company is experiencing a downward spiral, losing customers, losing money, and rumors of possible closure, bankruptcy and failure prevail.
The relationship with the manager is damaged beyond repair. The employee has sought help to mend the boss relationship but you know it is too damaged for recovery. (Perhaps you were untrustworthy, missed work on too many days, or the manager acts like an untrustworthy jerk.) Whatever the reason, the relationship is irrecoverably damaged.
The life situation has changed. Perhaps you have married or had a baby, and the salary and benefits no longer support your life needs. You need to move on to better opportunities to support your family.
The values are at odds with the corporate culture. Perhaps your company is egalitarian and you believe in assigned parking spots for salaried employees. Your company does annual employee satisfaction surveys and you think these are a waste of time. Your company is hierarchical and you want to influence every aspect of your job. No matter where the clash is occurring, a lack of congruence with the corporate culture will destroy your attitude at work.
Employee stopped having fun and enjoying your job. No matter what changed, when you dread going to work in the morning, it’s time to leave your job.
The company is ethically challenged. Perhaps, the managers lie to customers about the quality of the products or the day on which product will ship. You become aware that the company is stealing information from competitors. Whatever the issue, don’t stay in an organization where your ethics are out of sync.
For whatever reason, you have behaved in ways that are considered improper at work. You’ve missed too many days of work, slacked off on the job, failed to maintain needed skills and just generally developed the reputation of a loser. That reputation, once earned, is unlikely to change, so you might as well move on, while you have the opportunity.
Manager burned employee bridges with your co-workers. People group is not getting along in an environment that requires people to work together well. Again, at some point, the reasons don’t matter; start fresh in a new job and resolve to not let this situation happen again.
The stress level is so high at work that it is affecting your physical or mental health and your relationships with your friends and family. Watch for the signs of burnout and if they can’t be cured, move on. for some ideas about managing work stress.

1.Lack of work/life balance

People should work to live, not live to work. If your job consumes so much time that you have little left over for your relationships, hobbies and non-work obligations, then you need to make lifestyle changes. Every job has busy periods where you must devote extra time and energy to work. Maybe your company is in the middle of a major project or event, so you’re working nights and weekends. This is to be expected now and then. But if your organization always expects you to put work before the rest of your life, change is in order. Otherwise, your overall mental health and your relationships at home will suffer.

2. Lack of interest or motivation in your work

All jobs come with mundane tasks. If work was always entertaining, then it wouldn’t be called work. There will always be times when you wish you were doing something more interesting. But if you find yourself always watching the clock and wishing the workday would end, you’ve got a good reason to leave your job. Channel your frustrations into finding work that will provide challenges as well as a paycheck.

3. Lack of opportunity for advancement in your job

You must have realistic expectations about both financial compensation and opportunity for advancement in your job. But if you find yourself in a dead-end position with no opportunities to grow, learn and increase your income within the organization, you should consider starting a job search. Bettering yourself and your financial situation are good reasons to leave your job.

4. Seeing signs of trouble

Every organization goes through rough patches. If you are noticing layoffs, lack of raises, reduced hours, not enough work to go around, or other similar problems, that might be a good reason to look elsewhere. Or, on the flip side, you and your colleagues find yourselves being overworked as the company tries to do “more with less,” then it may be time to go as well.

5. Opportunity to pursue your passions

The happiest people are those who do what they love for a living. Trying to get closer to that goal is always a good reason to leave your job.

However, an impulsive decision to quite your stressful job so that you can write your novel may be too risky. Instead, plan out a more reasonable approach, like finding a more flexible and less stressful job that pays the bills but leaves you with time left over to write.

Perhaps the most important part of Planning for Performance is planning for performance measurement. Consequently, the central purpose of this publication is to help county-based Extension professionals incorporate a performance measurement focus into their long-range program plans. By planning to measure the performance of their programs, they are better prepared to meet current and future accountability challenges.

The planning usually includes some mechanism for linking the educational institution to the clients it intends to serve, an assessment of needs, and a process for assigning priority to the needs. This phase focuses on determining what needs to be done.

I will consider the current and future needs in terms of support they require to improve their performance in key areas, where foundation trusts must strive for excellence:

  • self-governing to the highest standards
  • effective strategic planning and risk management
  • contributing to the sustainability of the wider healthcare system
  • continuous improvement at all levels – quality, efficiency, productivity and business opportunities

Design development need: Conduct some sort of training needs analysis. Another method example of assessing and prioritizing training is DIF Analysis.
This commonly happens in the appraisal process Involve the people in identifying and agreeing relevant aligned training. Consider organizational values and aspects of integrity and ethics, and spirituality, love and compassion at work as well as skills.  Look also at your recruitment processes – there is no point training people if they are not the right people to begin wit Why people leave also helps identify development needs.

The coercive style is the least flexible and its use should be limited to emergency situations, like a pending takeover or recovery from natural disasters.  Its failure to foster pride or to support the development of initiative on the part of its employees places the largest constraint on its utility.  The affinitive style is based upon a caring and nurturing approach, which works well in conjunction with the authoritative style.  Affinitive leaders attempt to develop trust and create harmony through the use of continuous positive feedback.  These features allow for the development of bonds, teamwork, and communication that are needed when new teams are forming or tension exists within a current group.  The successful

implementation of this style greatly depends upon the development level of the employee.

  • Appreciation and rewards are key motivators that influence a person to achieve a desired goal. Rewarding good/ exceptional behavior with a small token of appreciation, certificate or letter can be a great motivator. If a certificate is awarded to a person, it should mention the particular act or the quality for which the individual is being rewarded.
  • Flexible working is now extremely attractive to a lot of workers, who value the ability to have more control over their work-life balance and their time. Surveys regularly show that initiatives such as flexi-working are increasingly becoming as important as, and in some cases more important than, pay. Flexible working includes flexible hours, remote working, part-time options and sabbatical leave.

It was established that a common practice for electricians is to miss a day of regular pay to work hours that pay time-and-a-half.  Although they have taken a day off, they still work a 40-hour week but get overtime pay for any hours beyond regular work hours.  Such workers, in effect, have given themselves a raise. Some companies have redefined overtime in their labor agreements as a way of addressing this problem.

Electricians reported that one way to reduce absenteeism was to schedule 40 hours in four days instead of five.  A schedule of 10 hours per day, Monday through Thursday, would leave electricians time on Fridays to conduct business or rest.  A missed day under this schedule would also result in a higher financial loss for workers.  Another suggestion was to schedule four 9-hour days with a half-day on Friday.

You must have realistic expectations about both financial compensation and opportunity for advancement in your job. But if you find yourself in a dead-end position with no opportunities to grow, learn and increase your income within the organization, you should consider starting a job search. Bettering yourself and your financial situation are good reasons to leave your job.

Human Resource Management

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