Physics

Witherite

Witherite

Witherite Definition Witherite (BaCO3) is a white, grey, or yellowish mineral consisting of barium carbonate in orthorhombic crystalline form: occurs in veins of lead ore. Witherite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and virtually always is twinned. The specific gravity is 4.3, which is high.....

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Cerussite

Cerussite

Cerussite Definition Cerussite (PbCO3) is a usually white mineral, found in veins. It is a source of lead. It is also called white lead ore. It is an interesting mineral, forming in an array of fascinating crystal formations and bizarre twinning habits. It is easily identifiable by its heavy weig.....

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Strontianite

Strontianite

Strontianite Definition Strontianite (SrCO3) is a white, lightly coloured, or colourless mineral consisting of strontium carbonate in orthorhombic crystalline form: it is a source of strontium compounds. t is a rare carbonate mineral and one of only a few strontium minerals. It is a member of the.....

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Stellerite

Stellerite

Stellerite Definition Stellerite is an uncommon member of the zeolite group, and is very similar in structure and formation to Stilbite, with a general formula of Ca[Al2Si7O18]·7H2O. It is named after Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709–1746) a famous German explorer, physician, and zoologist. Like mo.....

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Stilbite

Stilbite

Stilbite Definition Stilbite is a white or yellow zeolite mineral consisting of hydrated calcium sodium aluminium silicate, often in the form of sheaves of monoclinic crystals. Since its original classification, Stilbite was always regarded as a single mineral species with a slightly variable ele.....

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Zeolite

Zeolite

Zeolite Definition Zeolite is any of a family of hydrous aluminum silicate minerals, whose molecules enclose cations of sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium. Zeolites are usually white or colorless, but they can also be red or yellow. They are characterized by their easy and reversibl.....

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Hematite

Hematite

Hematite Definition Hematite is a reddish-brown to silver-gray metallic mineral. Its chemical formula: Fe2O3. Hematite occurs as rhombohedral crystals, as reniform (kidney-shaped) crystals, or as fibrous aggregates in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. It is the most abundant ore of iro.....

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Tridymite

Tridymite

Tridymite Definition Tridymite is a mineral SiO2 that is silica, differs from quartz in its usually minute thin tabular orthorhombic forms of crystallization, and is found in cavities in trachyte and similar rocks. Its its crystals are very distinct and form very different habits from Quartz. Man.....

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Magnesite

Magnesite

Magnesite Definition Magnesite (MgCO3) is a white, colourless, or lightly tinted mineral consisting of naturally occurring magnesium carbonate in hexagonal crystalline form, which is a source of magnesium and also used in the manufacture of refractory bricks. Magnesium-rich olivine (forsterite) f.....

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About Magnesium (Element)

About Magnesium (Element)

About Magnesium (Element) Definition Magnesium (symbol Mg) is a lightweight, moderately hard, silvery-white metallic element of the alkaline-earth group that burns with an intense white flame. Its atomic number 12; atomic weight 24.305; melting point 649°C; boiling point 1,090°C; specific gravi.....

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Magnetite

Magnetite

Magnetite Definition Magnetite is a brown to black mineral that is strongly magnetic. It crystallizes in the cubic system and commonly occurs as small octahedrons. Magnetite occurs in many different types of rock and is an important source of iron. Its chemical formula Fe3O4, and it is one of the.....

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Serpentinite

Serpentinite

Serpentinite Definition Serpentinite is a metamorphic rock consisting almost entirely of minerals in the serpentine group. Serpentinite forms from the alteration of ferromagnesian silicate materials, such as olivine and pyroxene, during metamorphism. Minerals in this group are formed by serpentin.....

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