Absolute Value of an Integer

Absolute Value of an Integer

The absolute value of an integer is the numerical value without regard to whether the sign is negative or positive. On a number line it is the distance between the number and zero.

Absolute value describes the distance of a number on the number line from 0 without considering which direction from zero the number lies. The absolute value of a number is never negative. The absolute value of 5 is 5.

The absolute value of -15 is 15. The absolute value of +15 is 15

The symbol for absolute value is to enclose the number between vertical bars such as |-20| = 20 and read “The absolute value of -20 equals 20”.

Absolute value describes the distance of a number on the number line from 0 without considering which direction from zero the number lies. The absolute value of a number is never negative.

Symbol used in absolute value

The symbol used to denote the absolute value is, two vertical lines (| |), one on either side of an integer.

Therefore, if ‘a’ represents an integer, its absolute value is represented by |a| and is always non-negative

Note:

(i) |a| = a; when ‘a’ is positive or zero.

(ii) |a| = -a; when ‘a’ is negative.

Examples on absolute value of an integer:

(i) Absolute value of – 7 is written as |- 7| = 7 [here mod of – 7 = 7]

(ii) Absolute value of + 2 is written as |+ 2| = 2 [here mod of + 2 = 2]

(iii) Absolute value of – 15 is written as |- 15| = 15 [here mod of – 15 = 15]

(iv) Absolute value of + 17 is written as |+ 17| = 17 [here mod of + 17 = 17]

Sample Problem

What’s the value of -|-5|?

We’ve got two negative signs and an absolute value sign. Let’s work our way from the inside out. Remember, anything inside those absolute value bars is positive.

-|-5| = -(5) = -5

 

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