Dies Non

Dies Non

It is a non-business day. It is a day on which no legal business can be done, or which does not count for legal purposes. It is a day when courts do not sit or carry on business. This will be without prejudice to any other action that the competent authorities might take against the persons resorting to such practices. It is a shortened from Latin phrase diēs nōn jūridicus literally: a day which is not juridical, that is, not reserved for legal affairs. In Latin, short for dies non-juridical‘ non-judicial day’. It is the day on which courts are not held.

In service terms, “dies non” means a day, which cannot be treated as duty for any purpose. It is a day on which no legal business can be done, or which does not count for legal purposes. According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law, Dies non is a part of the Latin phrase literally meaning “a day when courts do not sit or carry on business”. It is a day on which courts are not in session, as a legal holiday. The doctrine of “no-work-no-pay” is a fundamental axiom in industrial relations. The philosophy is very simple. When a person is employed, it is expected that the work assigned will be carried out. When this work is not done, the employee is not eligible for payment of any salary. In cases of such absence from work, the leave sanctioning authority may order that the days on which work is not performed be treated as dies non, i.e. they will neither count as service nor be construed as a break in service. It does not constitute a break in service. But the period treated as ‘dies non’ does not qualify as service for pensionary benefits or increment.