Ancient Egyptian “Lost Golden City” Called Biggest Find since Tutankhamun’s Tomb

The discovery of the largest ancient city ever discovered in Egypt has announced, giving the opportunity to focus on the common people of this era as opposed to the tombs in that magnificent tomb. About 3,400 years ago, Pharaoh Amenhotep III ruled a city near Luxor, opposite the Valley of the Kings, before buried under the sands of the Egyptian desert. Now it has found again and Egyptian scientists describe it as the most important archaeological discovery in Egypt since the tomb of Tutankhamun’s, the third grandson of Amenhotep discovered in 1922.

Like that famous discovery, it belongs to the 18th dynasty, probably the pinnacle of Egyptian power. Egyptian archaeologist, former antiquities minister, Dr Zahi Hawass announced the discovery on his Facebook page that an astonishing amount has achieved in seven months by keeping the search from leaking to the wider world. The city dubbed “The Rise of the Rise” or “The Lost Golden City”.

Ancient Egyptian “Lost Golden City” Called Biggest Find since Tutankhamun’s Tomb

The earthen brick walls, about 3 meters (10 feet) high, stand out and the rooms are filled with things like rings and pottery that somehow managed to avoid snatching it after its forgotten abandonment. Many items carry the Amenhotep III mark. Much functionality has already identified in a number of places, including the administrative area, a bakery, a main kitchen and a residential district. Hawass described the city as “the largest administrative and industrial center in the era of the Egyptian Empire on the west coast of Luxor.”

Numerous casting molds were used to make temple and tomb decorations. A pot of cooked meat weighing about 10 kg (22 lb) brought the inscription of his year and it was prepared for the festival. There is only one single entrance to the administrative area, which the House considers [[W] as a form of protection, with the ability to enter and control closed areas”, it thinks partly enclosed by walls built in the form of a wave. Although rare in ancient Egypt, examples of this style of our construction mostly belong to the 18-year dynasty. It later adopted by many other cultures because it provided more strength than plain walls without the need to add a second layer of bricks.