Cooking Oil

Cooking Oil

The oil is used in cooking foods is commonly derived from vegetables. Cooking oil is a plant, animal or synthetic fat that is used for cooking. It is commonly used for frying. It is also used in food preparation and flavoring that does not involve heat, such as salads. This oil is high in fat calories. It is typically a liquid at room temperature.

There is a wide variety of cooking oils from plant sources. They include olive oil, palm oil, soybean oil, canola oil, corn oil, and peanut oil. Many other kinds of vegetable oils are also used for cooking. Olives, safflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, sunflower seed, soy palm and coconut oil all contain about 13.5 grams fat and 120 calories per tablespoon.

Oil can be flavored by immersing aromatic foodstuff such as fresh herbs, peppers, garlic and so forth in the oil for a period of time. Palm oil is rich in natural chemical compounds important for health and nutrition. Olive oil is well known for its heart-healthy effects and is believed to be a key reason for the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. Carotenoids are natural chemical compounds that give crude palm oil its orange-red color. In fact, unrefined and crude palm oil is nature’s richest source of carotenoids when compared to other vegetable oils.

Palm oil has 15 more carotenoids than carrots and 30 times more than tomatoes. It consists mostly of saturated and monounsaturated fats, with small amounts of polyunsaturates. Palm oil is also rich in Vitamin E. In fact, no other vegetable oil has as much Vitamin E as palm oil. The oil is also rich in calories. Hundreds of thousands of families and communities have been lifted from poverty with their participation in the palm oil sector.