Green Wall – a vertical greening typology

Green Wall – a vertical greening typology

Green walls (also known as vertical gardens) have become a rising new trend of built environments in recent years. It is a vertical greening typology, where a vertical built structure is intentionally covered by vegetation. Green walls include a vertically applied growth medium such as soil, substitute substrate, or hydrocultures felt; as well as an integrated hydration and fertigation delivery system. They are vertical structures that have different types of plants or other greenery attached to them. Living green walls are a surefire way to enhance a building’s visuals, improve air quality as well as employee alertness and energy levels.

Green walls are vertically applied growth medium such as soil, substitute substrate, or hydrocultures felt; as well as an integrated hydration and fertigation delivery system.

They are also referred to as living walls or vertical gardens, and widely associated with the delivery of many beneficial ecosystem services. The greenery is often planted in a growth medium consisting of soil, stone, or water. Over the past half-century, a notable increase of urban-living seekers has led to a considerable uptick in air pollution and loss of green spaces.

There are many advantages to having green walls livening up space. First of all, the visual benefits of the living wall cannot be ignored. These walls can make us happier and more productive, as they appeal to our innate need to be around nature. Awareness of the role our surroundings play in our health and well-being will lead to new expectations towards the built environment, and the key element in re-populating our offices successfully will be to create workplaces where people feel safe to return to and spend their time in.

Living green walls (also commonly referred to as vertical gardens or living walls) are a wonderful solution for any property interested in improving their space with intrinsic benefits of nature. Green walls differ from the more established vertical greening typology of ‘green facades’ as they have the growth medium supported on the vertical face of the host wall, while green facades have the growth medium only at the base (either in a container or as a ground bed). Green walls differ from facades, which are often seen climbing up the outside walls of buildings, using them as structural support.

Living green walls infuse the dull expanse of interiors with life-renewing greenery. Green facades typically support climbing plants that climb up the vertical face of the host wall, while green walls can accommodate a variety of plant species. Green walls may be implanted indoors or outdoors; as freestanding installations or attached to existing host walls; and applied in a variety of sizes. Moreover, the greenery of facades can take a long time to grow enough to cover an entire wall, while green walls may be pre-grown.