Watch NASA’S Ingenuity Helicopter Spin Its Blades for the First Time

I hope that this Sunday, April 11, will become the first powered device to fly in any other world, NASA’s Curiosity helicopter is about to get flight-ready. The Martian helicopter was on the ground where it was diligently (carefully) dropped for a few days and is currently being tested after testing to make sure everything is in operation. NASA has confirmed that its blades are unlocked and ready to spin about 50 rotations per minute slowly, to test whether they are still effective. If they work, on Sunday, April 11, the mission team will take the rotation to 2,537 rpm and if it all looks good, it will stop.

It expected to climb to a height of 3 meters (10 feet) in about 3 seconds and then hover over the place before descending. The completely first flight took about 30 seconds. Curiosity is a technology demonstration, so every step taken so far really tells the story of a very successful mission. If the small helicopter flies on Sunday, there are four more planes planned for the team, daring each other, trying to understand the full potential of this vehicle.

Watch NASA’S Ingenuity Helicopter Spin Its Blades for the First Time

As the perseverance moves toward Van Jill Overlook, the solar-powered stimulus will try its first aircraft. The location is named after Jacob Van Jill, a team leader at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, who died in August last year. From that position, Perseverance will capture the flight of the engine in its high-resolution MastCam-Z camera system and even try to record audio through its two microphones, which not yet been achieved.

Supported by its light body, the helicopter’s pilots will rotate quickly to compensate for the thin Martian atmosphere. The test will carried out within a month of the aircraft flying out of Earth orbit. The results of the flight of the invention will contribute to further research on how humanity could one day bring humanity to Mars. According to NASA, the experiments will take place through the incremental stage. Its first flight will include a few feet up for half a minute.

However, the distance, height and duration will gradually increase throughout the demonstration until the team is satisfied. After recording the first-ever flying aircraft, Perseverance will travel with its own goal, collecting signs of life in Jezero ancient but long dry pond before returning to Earth for the next decade.

I hope that this Sunday, April 11, will become the first powered device to fly in any other world, NASA’s Curiosity helicopter is about to get the flight ready. The Martian helicopter was on the ground where it was diligently (carefully) dropped for a few days and is currently being tested after testing to make sure everything is in operation. NASA has confirmed that its blades are unlocked and ready to spin about 50 rotations per minute slowly, to test whether they are still effective. If they work, on Sunday, April 11, the mission team will take the rotation to 2,537 rpm and if it all looks good, it will stop.

It expected to climb to a height of 3 meters (10 feet) in about 3 seconds and then hover over the place before descending. The completely first flight took about 30 seconds. Curiosity is a technology demonstration, so every step taken so far really tells the story of a very successful mission. If the small helicopter flies on Sunday, there are four more planes planned for the team, daring each other, trying to understand the full potential of this vehicle.

As the perseverance moves toward Van Jill Overlook, the solar-powered stimulus will try its first aircraft. The location is named after Jacob Van Jill, a team leader at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, who died in August last year. From that position, Perseverance will capture the flight of the engine in its high-resolution MastCam-Z camera system and even try to record audio through its two microphones, which not yet been achieved.

Supported by its light body, the helicopter’s pilots will rotate quickly to compensate for the thin Martian atmosphere. The test will carried out within a month of the aircraft flying out of Earth orbit. The results of the flight of the invention will contribute to further research on how humanity could one day bring humanity to Mars. According to NASA, the experiments will take place through the incremental stage. Its first flight will include a few feet up for half a minute.

However, the distance, height, and duration will gradually increase throughout the demonstration until the team is satisfied. After recording the first-ever flying aircraft, Perseverance will travel with its own goal, collecting signs of life in Jezero’s ancient but long dry pond before returning to Earth for the next decade.