With Technology Matching Ours, Aliens on Nearby Worlds Might Know Earth is Habitable

Over the past decade, thousands of exoplanets have been discovered, with several major ones likely to be inhabited. In the journal Nature, astronomers have shifted this focus and identified exoplanets in our galactic neighborhood whose theoretical inhabitants may have been able to pass the Earth in front of the Sun and acknowledge its suitability for life. Colonel Professor Lisa Kaltenegger is trying to answer this question: How do aliens of similar technical level know that we are here? If they are not enough to detect our radio signals, the answer is probably less, but there is a better chance that they at least knew that the earth was suitable for life.

Kaltenegger said in a statement, “From the point of view of exoplanets, we are aliens.” “We wanted to know which stars block the sun’s light, so there’s the right vantage point to see the earth.” Although a number of methods have been used to detect exoplanets, the search for brightness in the brightest when a planet is transmitted across the face of its star has the limitations of successful transit methods. There are sorted. The American Museum’s Natural History Kaltenegger and Dr. Jackie Faherty have traced all the stars in 100 parsecs (326 light-years) so that the earth is transmitted from their point of view.

With Technology Matching Ours, Aliens on Nearby Worlds Might Know Earth is Habitable

The number came in at 1,402, but Kaltenegger noted that “as stars move into our moving universe, this effective space is lost and lost.” The pair uses Guy’s data on stereo movements that have reached a total of 2,034 to add all of them over the last 5,000 years to see the Earth’s transits (or the next 5000). Most of these stars are M-type red dwarfs, whose hosting life possibilities are widely disputed. Another 14 are A or B type-stars with lifespans much shorter than a lifetime host. However, it still leaves 194 G-type stars (section of the Sun) and another 189 just a little warmer or cooler.

As far as we know, seven of these stars are orbiting rocky planets, but the wealth of data collected through the TSES satellite is growing rapidly. The closest planet to Kaltenegger and Faherty’s criteria is Ross 128b, just 11 light-years away. Ross 128B does not transit from Earth – we have seen it using other methods – and we do not currently transit from its vantage point.