Tetrahedrite

Tetrahedrite is composed of two-component minerals: tetrahedrite, the end member rich in antimony, and tennantite, the end member rich in arsenic. It is a mineral of copper antimony sulfosalt with the formula: (Cu, Fe)12Sb4S13, that is an essential copper and sometimes silver ore. It occurs in metalliferous hydrothermal veins gray to black metallic crystals, or plates.

Tetrahedrite is the antimony endmember of the arsenic-bearing tennantite group of continuous solid solutions. Pure sequence end-members are rarely seen in nature, if ever. Tetrahedrite forms a solid solution sequence in which arsenic replaces antimony in the molecular structure with the related mineral tennantite. Crystals are normally well developed and very distinct. Less commonly found in dodecahedral or dodecahedral-tetrahedral combination crystals. Of the two the phase rich in antimony is more common. The framework also substitutes other elements, most notably iron and zinc, along with less common silver, mercury, and lead.

Tetrahedrite is really found in significant amounts in Switzerland, Germany, Romania, the Czech Republic, France, Peru, and Chile, and the two minerals happen in huge sums in Colorado, Idaho, and different regions in the western United States. Tetrahedrite gets its name from the particular tetrahedron molded cubic precious stones. The mineral typically occurs in massive form, it is gray steel to black metallic mineral with 3.5 to 4 Mohs hardness and 4.6 to 5.2 strong gravity.

Tetrahedrite crystals in a triangular pattern may be deeply striated, and may also be intergrown. California-based Alphabet Technology has announced plans to sell a tetrahedrite-based thermoelectric system to transform heat into electricity. The organization or company guaranteed that different thermoelectrics ordinarily produces about 2.5 percent proficiency, while tetrahedrite could accomplish 5 to 10 percent. In low to direct review aqueous and epithermal vein stores, and in contact transformative stores. Different thermoelectrics are either scant, costly or potentially harmful. Working with a characteristic material additionally lessens producing costs.

 

Information Sources:

  1. britannica.com
  2. minerals.net
  3. wikipedia