A Curious Galaxy That Is Very Young But Looks Very Old Is Puzzling Astronomers

Astronomers have discovered a galaxy that challenges our theory of how galaxies formed and evolved. The light from BLSS 073.1 comes to us just 1.2 billion years after the Big Bang, which actually made it a young galaxy, just does not look like it. Observations show a mature and established galaxy, an unexpected and wonderful discovery. In a new study published in science, astronomers took a sharp direct picture of the original galaxy produced so far, so that they could study the galaxy in detail. At the center of the ALSS 073.1 is a well-established and massive star, a so-called bulge and a uniform rotating disk around it. These features expected to take billions upon billions of years.

Dr. Federico Lelli, lead author from the University of Cardiff, said in a statement, “We discovered that a giant bulge, a regular rotating disk and possibly spiral weapons were already in the galaxy when only 10% of the current age of the universe existed.” “In other words, this galaxy looks like an adult but it should only be a small child. A galaxy like AALSS 073.1 simply denies our understanding of the formation of the galaxy.”

A Curious Galaxy That Is Very Young But Looks Very Old Is Puzzling Astronomers

The whole process of galaxy formation must be faster than previously thought to explain how ALSS 073.1 can look. Researchers have recently announced the discovery of a young galaxy with a rotating disk in the early universe, which has begun to challenge current models. However, the huge size bulge is an additional surprise. Bulge- a tightly packed star – is a feature that usually expected to grow over a long period thanks to the return of galaxy synthesis or by the galaxy’s internal processes. Either option has to be very fast. Half of all the stars in ALESS 073.1 are located in the bulge, Co-author from Cardiff University. “This spectacular discovery challenges our current perception of how galaxies take shape because we believe that these traits originated only in“mature”galaxies, not in young people,” says Timothy Davis; a co-author from Cardiff University says Timothy Davis.

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) led to a remarkable solution to the observations. The Observatory monitors wavelengths beyond the visible and can study some of the very distant things we have discovered to truly understand how galaxies evolved; we need to look further into the distant and early universe. Fortunately, these should be in the coming decade. Future observations such as the ultimately large telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope will hopefully are able to add more insights to this particularly bizarre object and perhaps look further.