First Industrial Perovskite Cell Production Launches the Solar Power of the Future

The world’s first large-scale production of perovskite solar cells has begun in an amazing place. Perovskite have been acclaimed for over a decade as we generate electricity and enter the era of clean energy production initiate. However, after many more technologies failed to survive the hype, most observers did not want to get too high of their expectations. We are going to find out if this is the real thing. Most current solar energy uses silicon photovoltaic cells. The decline in the price of silicon cells has been surprising, spending less than 1 percent of what they did almost 40 years ago, while efficiency and reliability have increased dramatically.

No other source of energy in history has been found so cheap, so quickly. Solar engineers, however, have long acknowledged that silicon cannot exceed performance limits, and it looks like we’re getting closer and closer to finding something better. Perovskites (with proper storage) look like the best chance to end the reign of fossil fuels. Scientists have proven that the crystals around the calcium titanate structure and the small amount of metals can convert solar energy into electricity in just nine years.

First Industrial Perovskite Cell Production Launches the Solar Power of the Future

At the time, their skills improved much faster than any competing solar technology. Even better, perovskites require much less energy and expense than silicon cells (which require higher-temperature production) and are probably more versatile. In 2013, Dr. Olga Malinkiewicz demonstrated that it was possible to produce inkjet printing techniques with paroxysmal cells, further reducing production costs. Nevertheless, larger production forecasts by 2018 have not been met. At first the perovskites were rapidly reduced in contact with air and water. 

Moreover, all solar cells continue to lose efficiency on a larger scale than laboratory experiments, but the curve was particularly steep for perovskites. Progress has been made on both fronts, but these and other obstacles have hampered commercial-scale production. Now, however, Malinkiewicz has launched the world’s first industrial-scale perovskites cell production line using its invented inkjet printing technique. Named after the Baltic Sun Goddess, Malinkiewicz’s company Sol Technologies has started production in Wroclaw, Poland. The position is significant because Poland is the most coal dependent country in Europe.