New Ultra-Thin Film Tech could Turn Regular Glasses into Night Vision Goggles

There are many benefits to being able to see in the dark, such as stealth mode or never hitting your toes or hitting your knee again at night. However, we humans are going to go to this superpower Night Vision Goggles. These are already present, they’ve been around for a while, you might think – but scientists have recently created an ultra-thin film that can be applied to turn regular glasses into night vision goggles. Hujjah, night vision goggles for everyone. Although still a proof-of-concept, a team of Australian and European scientists detailed in the Journal of Advanced Photonics how transparent film can transform into infrared light – which is usually invisible to the human eye – into visible light.

New Ultra-Thin Film Tech could Turn Regular Glasses into Night Vision Goggles

One of its applications is applied to standard lightweight glasses, they can replace the current huge, heavy military type night-vision goggles. Lead researcher Dr Rocio Camacho Morales of the Australian National University, said in a statement, “We have made the invisible visible.” “We’ve created a very thin film that contains nanometer-scale crystals, which are several times thinner than human hair, can be applied directly to glasses and act as filters, allowing you to see in the dark at night.”

Dition Theoretically, night vision goggles use optic electronic image magnification, which reflects small amounts of infrared light that we cannot see, converting that light into electrons that amplify the light and display it digitally in that well-known green shade. Instead the first type of film is made from a semiconductor, gallium arsenide, arranged in an ultra-thin crystal structure to manipulate light, allowing visible light to pass through. The film converts the incoming photons of light from infrared light into the high-energy photons we can see. “This is the first time anywhere in the world that any infrared light has been successfully converted into visible images on an ultra-thin screen,” said Professor Dragomir Neshev, co-author of the study.

“It’s a really exciting development and we know it will change the landscape forever for night vision.” According to researchers, this development revolutionized night vision technology and its accessibility. Currently used by the military, police and security guards, heavy night vision goggles can cause chronic neck injuries. Light weight glasses will be easy and safe to use.